Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Occupational Health & Safety Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

  • Women and Occupational Health
    Occupational Medicine
    Construction and Ergonomics
    Agricultural Health and Environmental Health & Safety>

Session Introduction

Chen-Peng Chen

China Medical University, Taichung Taiwan

Title: Change in metabolic load and thermoregulation as a result of using N95 masks under influence of temperature

Time : 11:00 - 11:20

Speaker
Biography:

Chen-Peng Chen is an Associate Professor at the Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, Taiwan. He received his PhD in Environmental Toxicology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his postdoctoral training from the Colorado School of Mines. He was a Scientist at the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in affiliation with the National Occupational Research Agenda Dermal Exposure Research Program from December 2001 to May 2006, and also the Acting Director of the Program from 2005 to 2006. He has published over 70 papers, with 20 being SCI-indexed journal articles.

Abstract:

N95 masks are commonly used in a variety of environmental settings to protect the workers from inhalation of airborne particulates. However, the confinement of the nose and mouth when using a mask interrupts the direct exchange of metabolic heat with the air, risking an excess physiological strain, particularly in the workplaces where elevated temperature and humidity may be expected. We studied the change in metabolic load and thermoregulation when N95 masks of different facepiece designs were used.In the study, twenty participants (10 males and 10 females)were evaluated for physiological properties involved in thermoregulation, including those of body-core thermal load (metabolic rate, blood pressure, pulse rate, and core temperature) and of peripheral heat exchange (transepidermal water loss, skin moisture, and skin temperature), when they used N95 masks(a cup-shaped and a three-flap foldable mask) in a climatic chamber pre-set at a temperature of 19-34ºC and a relative humidity of 65%.The readings of physiological indicatorswere taken during the periods of acclimation and respirator use and were compared to analyze the thermal strain attributed to respirator use. The results revealed a significant level of thermoregulation, evidenced by the increase in TEWL and skin moisture, as required for the dissipation of metabolic heat when the N95 masks were used. The males showed a greater thermoregulatory responseto respirator use than the females. When using a respirator,the users should consider a mask of greater flexibility and reduce the duration of each single use to alleviate the thermal strain.

Michaela Machajova

Trnava University, Slovakia

Title: Assessment of energy expenditure in workers in the automotive industry

Time : 11:20 - 11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Machajova M is a Doctor at the Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Work. She has completed her PhD at the age of 27 years from Trnava University, Slovakia. She is the Vice-Head of Department of Public Health and lecturer with a particular interest in Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Health. She has international working experience from the University of Parma in Italy, where she was a member of the research team testing a non-invasive method for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases. She has worked in Occupational Health Services as a Public Health Specialist focusing on Risk assessment, planning and management of the preventive programs aimed at health promotion and protection.

Abstract:

Introduction: Number of musculoskeletal disorders as a consequence of inadequate working conditions is still increasing. An important indicator of physical load is energy expenditure. Objectives: The main objective of this work was to assess the energy expenditure of the selected groups of workers during the work shift in the automotive industry. The intermediate objectives were to measure the heart frequency and energy consumption of workers and the results compared with the legal regulations of the Slovak Republic. To find out the difference in the levels of energy expenditure between different working positions. To determine energy expenditure by using index method and the results compared with measured values. Methods: Heart frequency and energy expenditure of observed group of workers was determined on the basis of data recorded by the measuring device Polar RS 400. The results were compared with the Ministry of Health Slovak Republic Decree NR. 542/2001 by sex and age group. Energy expenditure was further determined based on time and values according to index method of Borský. Results: It was found that heart frequency was exceeded overall in 8 employees and value of energy expenditure in 4 employees. Between working positions, we not confirmed the difference in the values of energy expenditure of workers (p>0.05). There is no difference between the values of energy expenditure determined according to Borský method and measured through the Polar device (p>0.05). Conclusion: Although there has not been a significant overshooting of permitted standards, it is still necessary to control the workload of workers and prevent potential health complications and adverse health impacts of inadequate work performance.

Mikhail Karganov

Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russia

Title: Polysystemic analysis for risk group revealing in nuclear plant stuff

Time : 11:40 - 12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mikhail Karganov was born in Odessa, USSR. In 1980 he graduated from Moscow Mendeleev Institute of Chemical Technology, organic-fuel faculty, technology of microbiological production. He has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russian Academy of medical sciences, postdoctoral studies D.Sci. degree (2001) from the same Institute. From 2001 till now he is the Head of Laboratory of Polysystemic Investigations of Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology. The sphere of his scientific researches of the last 15 years includes the development of new biophysical methodologies which enable to detect in a rapid noninvasive mode the functional status of regulatory systems of organism responsible for preservation of its adaptive potencies. They offered to define this new trend in the medical diagnostics of so-termed dysregulation state of organism, which precedes formation of different pathological processes, as objective sanological monitoring.

Abstract:

The health risk due to radiation exposure and the causality can be revealed only through long-term and detailed radiobiological and epidemiological studies. Many individuals (medical staff, aircrew, miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons tests participants, nuclear industry workers) are, or have been, exposed to ionizing radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations. By a wide range of effects, the existing real radiation, physical, chemical, and biological hazards can be divided into two categories: 1) risks in the deterministic range of doses and concentrations (doses and concentrations far surpassing the established thresholds), 2) risks in the stochastic range of doses and concentrations (doses and concentration near the established thresholds). In the deterministic range of doses and concentrations, the biological effects strictly depend on doses and concentrations of anthropogenic factors and can be detected by existing methods of epidemiological analysis. In the stochastic range of doses and concentrations of anthropogenic factors, the consequences strictly depend on individual sensitivity of biological objects, including humans. Due to individual variability of physiological processes, the same anthropogenic factor in equal doses and concentrations will cause certain effects in some organisms (sensitive), will not cause in others, and will induce resistance in the thirds. This implies that at the population level three subpopulations should be determined at relatively low-dose and low-concentration exposures: Sensitive, neutral, and super resistant. The ratio between these subpopulations can serve as a measure of population risk from this exposure. Stable fixation of the pathological trace is preceded by processes of dysregulation of the corresponding functions. The most probable pathological outcomes can be predicted on the basis of the results of polysystemic monitoring by detecting dysregulation in certain systems of the organism (cardiorespiratory, psychomotor, and metabolism systems). Monitoring is carried out using computerized measurement instrumentation and data processing systems, which provides the basis for strict quantitative assessment of the dynamics of risk for the studied populations. The testing included seven functional systems: constitution, myocardial contractility, autonomic regulation of the heart rate, regulation of peripheral circulation, psychomotor regulation, and respiratory regulation. Using this approach, we examined workers of 1) Shipyard for repair and recycling of nuclear-powered ships (130 workers) 2) Nuclear fuel complex plant (300 workers). We can assume that working conditions in group of workers with directly exposed group (welders, burners, riveters, fitters, and other workers on the vessel hull) lead to aggravation of functional strain in the psychomotor system. The population examined by us is characterized by high percent of workers with job tenure more than 10 years. Despite the above peculiarities, a half of the examinees had no verified chronic pathologies. Cardiovascular pathologies constitute 13% of all verified pathologies. It was 2.5-fold less incident than pathologies of the locomotor apparatus and inflammatory and degenerative processes. Low incidence of somatic pathologies in the analyzed population attests to good health status of workers, which can be explained by effective therapeutic and preventive measures. The incidences of pathologies of the locomotor apparatus and inflammatory and degenerative diseases were similar in all groups (26-32%). These findings suggest that the detected functional burden by the psychomotor system disturbances in directly exposed group reflects peculiarities of functional adaptation, rather than premorbid state of the individual. The fact that pathologies of the locomotor apparatus rank first among somatic diseases attests to indirect effect of strain on these processes. General metabolic changes were evaluated by the method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS). This method allows evaluation of the percent contribution of particles with different size into light scattering in biological fluids. Basing on the increase (or decrease) in the percent contribution of particles of this or that fraction into light scattering, the proposed semiotic classification of serum/plasma samples including 8 shifts of various directions in homeostasis and humoral immunity: intoxication-, catabolic-, dystrophic-, allergic-, autoimmune-like, and normological spectra and 2 types of mixed spectra. The percent of intoxication-like shifts increases with deterioration of working conditions. In the group with the worst working conditions, analysis of the urine revealed predominance of allergic-like shifts. This method was used by us in the study performed on a nuclear fuel plant for detection of groups at risk of hematological diseases and evaluation of the severity and prognosis of the course of these diseases on the basis of the detected metabolic shifts. We evaluated the distribution of subcellular components of biological fluids from patients with hematological diseases (iron-deficient and B12-deficient anemia’s, lymphogranulomatosis, multiple myelomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelocytic leukemia, thrombocytemia, and polycythemia). Thus, a risk group for hematological diseases (anemia, n=11 and erythremia, n=5) was determined. The validity of the risk group formation was confirmed by standard hematological studies. LCS analysis of blood serum and urine and standard clinical blood testing for eosinophil count detected a risk group for allergic diseases (5 women and 8 men). This group included individuals with moderate or pronounced allergic shifts and mixed shifts with the allergic component. Since the target was detection of the risk group by the brochopulmonary pathologies, further functional testing revealed reduced vital lung capacity in 5 examinees. Tiffeneau index was reduced in 4 individuals; this parameter is more important for evaluation of allergic bronchopulmonary pathologies. In 2 examinees, reduced Tiffeneau index was associated with increased relative content of eosinophil’s. Conclusion Based on the above, the algorithm of evaluation of chronic radiation, chemical, and combined risks should include the following steps: 1. On the basis of the detected shifts in the system regulating metabolism and immunity (LCS of biological fluids), reference groups for differentiation significant shifts are formed. 2. In the corresponding reference groups, variants related to functional tension in the major physiological systems are detected. 3. On the basis of systemic analysis of the tensest states in the major physiological systems, risk groups for the corresponding pathologies are formed within the selected reference groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Ruey-Yu Chen has a doctorate in Public Health. She is presently an Associate Professor in Taipei Medical University. She has teaching and research experience of 24 years. Her research passion is occupational health and work site health promotion. She heads the Taiwan northern center of work site health promotion supported by Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare for ten years.

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between “Health Culture” and “Productivity Loss”, and provide an evidence for employers to support workplace health promotion. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted between February and May 2012. Four enterprises (2 manufacturing and 2 service industries) were selected as study subjects. Volunteer employees were recruited to complete a self-administered questionnaire. The contents of questionnaire include demographic characteristics, health status, health behaviors, work performance, presenteeism, absenteeism, and organizational culture. The Stress Satisfaction Offset Score (SSOS) developed by Dr. Martin Shain was used to assess organizational culture. The Business Health Culture Index (BHCI) is defined as the average SSOS of workers in an enterprise. Health Related Productivity Loss (HRPL) was calculated from absenteeism and presenteeism multiply work performance. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results: A total of 388 employees (57.5% male) completed questionnaire. Although the female were younger, had less working hours and more health behaviors, they reported more absenteeism, presenteeism, and HRPL. The average HRPL were 0.97 and 1.24 days/month for male and female participants. The average score of SSOS in each company (i.e. BHCI) was all positive value (+0.29 ~+0.72), showing the employees slightly more satisfaction than stress at work. The multiple linear regression analysis showed that the score of SSOS and health behaviors were negative correlated to HRPL; on the contrary the number of chronic diseases was positive correlated to HRPL. Conclusion: It is suggested that improving organizational culture and employee's health behaviors were important strategies for reducing HRPL.

Shaun Lundy

University of Greenwich, UK

Title: Professional ethics in occupational safety and health practice

Time : 12:20 - 12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Shaun Lundy has over 25 years’ experience as both an academic and practitioner in the field of health and safety. He is currently the Academic Portfolio Leader for BSc and MSc programs in Safety, Health, and Environment at the University of Greenwich. He currently sits on the Health and Safety Executives Myth Busters Challenge Panel set up by the UK Government to scrutinize dubious health and safety decisions in the public interest. He is also the technical editor for Agora business publications, the Health and Safety Advisor and Health and Safety in Schools and Colleges. He has a keen interest in education, competence and ethics in relation to health and safety practice.

Abstract:

This paper provides a critical evaluation of a real world project involving the review and subsequent development of a new Code of Conduct for the world’s largest health and safety body, the Institution of Occupational Safety Health (IOSH, 2011). The project was conducted as action research and was divided into 4 cycles or stages. Stage 1 involved the critical review and benchmarking of the existing code against other codes using an adaptation of the Professional Associations Research Network (PARN) criteria. Stage 2 involved the consultation process for the development of a new code. This included the researcher’s role as leader of the project and an evaluation of misconduct cases reviewed by the PC. Stage 3 involved semi-structured interviews of practitioners to explore experiential accounts of ethical issues from practice to inform the guidance on the code. Finally, stage 4 involved the concluding consultation and consolidation of all the stages for presentation of the revised code to IOSH council for approval. The outcome of the project has been positively received by IOSH. A new code was produced with guidance and a revised disciplinary procedure that is fit for purpose and adaptable to change through the use of robust development and broad consultation processes. It is anticipated that these changes will make a significant contribution to the wider profession and practice. An ethical decision making model was developed from the findings and included a dissemination strategy.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmad Latif is a Physician Web Editor and Author with a special interest in workplace health promotion. He worked for Qatar Petroleum Occupational Health Division; Head of workplace health promotion program since 2008 and web editor of fittowork.net; a worker’s wellness website. He received his MBBS degree from The Damascus University and holds a degree in Internal Medicine from Ministry of Health, Damascus Hospital, Syria, and diploma in Occupational Medicine from the Royal College of Physicians of London. He served in several hospitals and healthcare centers in Syria, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Abstract:

This paper highlights the advantages of pre-employment medical examination. Recently value of pre employment medical examination has been questioned in developed countries since there is lack of trials and evidence related to health outcomes from it. The aim is to determine the rate of newly diagnosed chronic diseases among Qatar Petroleum (QP) potential employees and to compare the rates between employees from developing countries and developed nations (GCC countries, Western countries). Using cross sectional method, this study utilized pre-employment medical examination data available in QP Medical Services. During 3 months period 679 candidates underwent pre-employment medical, 499 belonging to developing countries and 280 from other developed countries. Health data and laboratory results scrutinized to identify the newly diagnosed cases of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Hypertension (HTN) for both groups. In the study group ( developed countries): 37 cases of DM, 29 is newly diagnosed (7.25%) and 31 cases HTN, 27 newly diagnosed (6.75%), in compare with control group 24 case of DM , 7 is newly diagnosed (2.5%) and 19 HTN cases 4 newly diagnosed (1.4%). The odds ratio of newly discovered DM in the two groups during the pre employment medical is OR 3.057 95% CI (1.319 to 7.081). Odds ratio of newly discovered HTN in the two groups during the pre-employment medical is OR: 5.01, 95% CI (1.732 to 14.478). Although the value of pre-employment medical has been questioned in developed countries, we noticed a positive health outcome to the group from developing countries.

Letanovsky P and Machajova M

Trnava University, Slovakia

Title: The feasibility study of the occupational health service

Time : 13:50 - 14:10

Biography:

Letanovsky P has completed his Master of Science in Public Health from Trnava University in 2003 and he is studying his doctoral studies at St. Elizabeth University of Health and Social Sciences in Bratislava. He was director of Health Promotion Department of the Ministry of Health, Public Health Authority and coordinator of the Occupational Health Service Program in the Ministry of Defense. He has practical experience in the field of health policy, public health threats and health services management and administration. He worked as a coordinator in cooperation between WHO and Slovak republic in the field of chronic diseases prevention.

Abstract:

Introduction: The cost benefit analysis and the estimation of resources which are important for implementation of health policies are still insufficient. The design and proposal of health policies are based mainly on the epidemiological work method without economic assessment and real resources estimation. Objectives: The main research goal of our study was to verify way how to use an economic feasibility study in the field of public health services. Methods: The model of public health service which was selected was the occupational health service for 16-thousand employees. Results: The results of the study shows that an economic feasibility study is tool which is very good suitable in the field of public health. However, an economic feasibility study could be tailored for specific health policy. Health demand and available resources are met in the process of health policy planning. These two factors are important for implementation of health policy and health service into the practice. This hypothesis confirms result of the study which set costs in the range from 877 979 to 8 034 858 EURO and implementation of the occupational health service never began because of costs which were required. Conclusion: An occupational health service is fund from employer. Because of that the total amount of resources are limited and from the time when occupational health services were established and laws came in to the force employers have fought against those laws. For employer, an occupational health service is only “economic andadministrative weight”.

Mohsen Vigeh

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan

Title: Prenatal metal exposure and pregnancy outcomes: trimester with higher predictability

Time : 14:10 - 14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Mohsen Vigeh is a research scientist at Japanese National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan, since May 2007. Prior to coming to Japan, Mohsen served in the Tehran University for several years. He has experienced as principal researcher for several local and international studies. In additional, Mohsen work as part-time teaching staff for Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine Juntendo University (the oldest medical school in Japan). Mohsen has many publications in local and international journals, in English, Japanese, and Persian. Similarly, he has presented some of his findings in international conferences/scientific summits. Mohsen has obtained his Ph.D in Social Medicine (public health) from the University of Tokyo, the best Japanese and world class university, and MD form Tehran University, the best Iranian university. Mohsen has been conducting several epidemiological studies in different topics, such as air pollution, toxicology of metals, human reproductive health, and child mental development.

Abstract:

Introduction: Pregnancy is a unique period in women life, which toxic material exposure during this period of time can influence fetus health for long-life. Recently, exposure to toxic metals decreased sharply in both general population and workers. On the other hand, pregnant women are not usually exposed to very high levels of toxic metal to show clear clinical symptoms, but their fetuses may suffer several adverse effects, which often do not detect before delivery, such as developmental problems. Methods: In a longitudinal survey, we recruited 364 participants to estimate prenatal metal exposure effects on various pregnancy outcomes. Maternal whole blood (taken between 8–12 and 20–24 weeks of gestation, and at delivery) and umbilical cord blood samples were collected for blood metals measurement. We followed-up the pregnant women till delivery and collected data about various pregnancy outcomes in both mothers and newborns. Results: In almost all outcomes, we found that blood metals at the first trimester of pregnancy have a more significant effects on pregnancy out comes, such as preterm labor, preterm rupture of the membranes, and early child mental development than the concentrations in the second and third trimester, or in the umbilical cord blood. Conclusion: Prenatal blood metal level at the first trimester of pregnancy can be a useful predictive factor for many of adverse pregnancy outcomes than the subsequent ones. Therefore, toxic metal exposure protection or screening programs for high-risk women, such as female workers, should be considered no later than the first trimester of pregnancy to prevent adverse effects, because later intervention may not be sufficient to prevent both mother and fetus.

Speaker
Biography:

Kevin Hedges expects to complete his PhD in 2014. He is Australian and more recently has become a permanent resident of Canada. He has 24 years’ experience in Occupational Hygiene and is certified with the Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists (AIOH) and American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH). He has been the recipient of awards presented by the AIOH which has allowed him to complete a Masters in 2000, and also provided him with the opportunity to present at International Conferences including the International Occupational Hygiene Association (IOHA) conference in Rome, Italy. He has extensive industry experience and also has held positions as Principal Occupational Hygienist with the Queensland Government. He currently is employed with the Newfoundland/Labrador, Canadian Provincial Government.

Abstract:

Exposure to repairable crystalline silica among quarry workers in Queensland was assessed. The assessment evaluated airborne concentrations of repairable crystalline silica, lung function and risk factors including exposure profile, particle size distribution and morphology. Results from personal exposure monitoring show that exposures exceeded the Safe Work Australia Exposure Standard of 0.1 mg/m3 at many sites. The median maximum physical diameter of sampled particles was found to be 3.9 µm which is close to the theoretical median aerodynamic diameter of 4.25 µm provided in Australian Standard AS 2985 -2009. However, most particles identified and measured by Scanning Electron Microscopy had a diameter of 2 µm and thus mass based sampling using a cyclone may not provide an accurate estimate of risk where particles less than this size are considered to present a greater risk. An unexpected finding was the identification of particles that had needle-like morphology. A high proportion of sampled workers demonstrated restrictive and obstructive lung function patterns of varying severity. The findings of this study and others indicate that the current exposure standard for crystalline silica is not adequate to protect workers’ respiratory health. Data also serve as a prompt to re-evaluate how worker health and health surveillance should be managed and regulated in mines and quarries. More data collection with follow-up statistical analysis will add power to this study. It is also suggested that the particle shape (morphology) is a key factor which warrants further investigation when assessing the impact particles have on the lung.

Speaker
Biography:

Leah Okenwa Emegwa completed her PhD in Social Medicine/Public health sciences in 2011 from the Karolinska Medical University (KarolinskaInstitutet), Sweden. She is currently a senior lecturer at the department of Public and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Sweden. She serves as a reviewer for reputable journals.

Abstract:

Work related injuries continue to contribute to the global burden of disease and injuries. According to recent global estimates, about a million workers are injured and a thousand die per day due to work injuries. In Sweden, trends in reporting work place injuries have varied over time with various peaks and troughs.Differences have been observed between the reporting ofinjuries requiring sick leaves and those requiring no sick leaves, the so called ‘zero’ accidents.There are however few studies exploring the specific trends and patterns of occupational injuries in Sweden. Even problematic is the fact that available studies are very industry specific. Aim: To explore trends in workplace injuries and associated socio-demographic risk factors in the county of Gävleborg, Sweden.The study also aims to look at sick leave patterns in terms of total number of days absent from week and their determinants. Method: The study is based on retrospective longitudinal data comprising of all cases of work place accidents between 1992 and 2012 which were reported to the Swedish social insurance agency. A total of 24129 cases were reported across different industries. Data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: Preliminary results show that work place injuries vary by social demographic factors (such as age, sex, type of employment status) and industry.Results also show that age and sex are major determinants of total number of sick leave days. Conclusion: The implication for interventions and further research are discussed.

Mei-Yung Leung

Assistant Professor,City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Application of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Approach to Construction Professionals

Time : 15:25 - 15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Leung has more than twenty years of practical/teaching experience in the construction industry/education and has participated in a number of prestigious construction projects in Hong Kong. She is a Chartered Quantity Surveyor in RICS, UK and HKIS, HK and a Charted Builder in CIOB, UK and AIB, Australia. She successfully completed all three levels of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction training in HK, Australia and US. Currently, she is a chairman of the Hong Kong Institute of Value Management (HKIVM). She is a Certified Value Specialist of the SAVE International ‘The Value Society’ in USA and a HKIVM (List A) facilitator for VM workshops internationally. Her current researches cover stress management, construction project management, value management, facility management, and construction education. She has attracted over HK$ 15.6 million as investigator in 44 professional and research projects over 10 years. There are over 150 international publications in construction engineering and management at present. Recently, she has obtained the Fulbright-RGC Senior Research Scholar Award issued by the Hong Kong-America Center and the UGC, which will further support her research at the University of Southern California and the University of Pennsylvania in the USA for over six months this year.

Abstract:

Purpose –Stress influences not only individual health and performance, but also project profitability and organizational development. In order to well manage the stress in the industry, the study introduces a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) approach to construction professionals. MBSR focuses on the progressive obtainment of mindful and non-evaluative awareness in various aspects of individual lives, including physical sensations, perceptions, thoughts, imagery, and so on. Through MBSR practices, construction professionals are expected to alleviate individual physical and psychological disorders. This presentation, thus, investigates the impact of MBSR characteristics on the stress of construction professionals. Design – Based on extensive literature, a questionnaire survey was designed to investigate the relationship between the characteristics of MBSR and the stress of construction professionals. In the end, 84 respondents returned. Reliability analysis and Pearson correlation were adopted by using the software SPSS version 19.0. Findings – This paper has identified 12 main characteristics of MBSR (i.e., attention, present focus, acceptance, patience, beginner’s mind, trust, self-compassion, non-reaction, non-judging, non-striving, letting go and description) and two types of stress (i.e., work stress and emotional stress). The results of correlation indicated that (1) work stress was significantly negatively associated with non-striving; (2) emotional stress is negatively related to description, non-judging, trust and letting go, but positively related to attention; and (3) work stress and emotional stress is positively related. Therefore, MBSR characteristics such as non-striving, description, non-judging, trust and letting go can help reduce the stress level of construction professionals, while attention might aggravate emotional problems of construction professionals. Originality /Value – Based on the findings, several practical recommendations are proposed. To manage stress and improve job performance, a systematic 8-week MBSR therapy including multiple mindfulness skills (such as body scan, mindfulness sitting and breathing) is, thus, strongly recommended to the construction professionals. The results are expected to cultivate construction professionals with stress management skills for handling their complicated work tasks and emotional problems.

Melih Güneri

Tetra Pak Health and Safety Coordinator, Turkey

Title: Health and safety management system to prevent workplace accidents

Time : 15:45 - 16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Melih Güneri holds a BS in Environmental Engineering from Dokuz Eylul University. He is currently working at Tetra Pak as a Health and Safety Coordinator. Prior to Tetra Pak, he worked at Phillip Morris International (2009–2010) and Hayes Lemmerz International (2011–2013) as a Health and Safety & Environmental Protection Engineer.

Abstract:

Every year people die or become permanently disabled as a result of occupational accidents. In order to prevent these accidents, a health and safety management system must be established and utilized effectively at every work place. This abstract aims to explain how the system works and to articulate how each component is essential for the system to operate successfully. The system may be defined in four phases. Phase 1 - Policy Firstly, a health & safety policy is defined. System must happen and targets are defined with respect to the main health and safety policies. After defining the targets, a master plan that covers both the present and future roles can be generated. Phase 2 - Data Collection Data collection is one of the most important components of a health and safety management system. In order to assess the behavioral and conditional risks in a work environment, a thorough and accurate data set must be established and updated simultaneously. Phase 3 - Risk Assessment Risk assessment is the key component of the system. The result of the assessment should then be used to determine the steps that need to be taken to eliminate all the risk factors. Phase 4 - Audit & Revision System needs to be audited and based on the defined indicators, the results must be reviewed regularly and deviations must be reassessed individually. As a result of these assessments, sub-strategies may be defined to compensate instantaneous risk factors. The phases are going to be explained in details during the speech basing on the industrial experiences and applications. Moreover, applications in different sectors will be reviewed and compared for enlarging the point of view.

Ali Alnuaimi

Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Title: Assessment of safety and health risks at construction projects of Oman

Time : 16:05 - 16:25

Biography:

Ali S Alnuaimi, Professor Ali S Alnuaimi, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. He was an outstanding instructor of short courses offered at Sultan Qaboos University for 7 years, from the Director of the Centre for Community Service and Continuing Education.

Abstract:

In this research, a field survey was conducted via 30 interviews with safety and health experts and risk management staff in the field of construction industry in Oman followed by a questionnaire divided into six categories. 151 responses were analysed. The aim was to explore the availability, awareness, type and implementation of ORA. Six key risks were identified; namely: Working at heights; working on fragile roofs; using electrical equipment; working under high voltage overhead power lines; working in confined spaces; working without knowing how to use the provided emergency equipment. All respondents were male gender and 61 per cent of them were below the age of 40. 59% of respondents have education equal to or below the national diploma (≤12 levels). 75.5% of the respondents work in construction industry followed by the consultants (19%). 53% of respondents were labourers and technicians. 96% of projects were residential, commercial or a combination of residential and commercials buildings. 81.3% of workers were having equal or less than 10 years of experience in the construction projects. 53% of respondents never experienced fatality during their work. 53.6% of respondents indicated that they do not have risk assessment matrix for occupational safety and health. All respondents agreed that it is important or very important to apply Occupational Risk Assessment Matrix in accordance with the local regulations. Only 42.4% strongly agree that HSE personal should carry out risk assessment before any activity. Most respondents showed willingness of applying risk management by workers.

Speaker
Biography:

Takalani G Tshitangano is a lecturer in the Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Venda. She is an emerging researcher with 23 years of public service experience in various fields. She has published eleven papers in peer reviewed accredited journals. She reviews manuscripts for Curationis South African peer reviewed Journal. She is actively engaged in research projects in partnership with Vhembe district. Her specific areas of expertise and interests include health promotion in communities and schools, infection control, management of chronic lifestyle diseases, control of communicable diseases such TB and HIV; and general management.

Abstract:

Background: Tuberculosis is a major occupational hazard in low and middle-income countries. Health care workers are frequently exposed to infectious tuberculosis patients and are likely to be infected and suffer from latent tuberculosis infection. This study investigated practices of managing health care workers’ latent tuberculosis infection at hospitals. Methods: A qualitative approach using cross-sectional descriptive case study design was adopted. Purposive sampling was used to select 57 focus group participants. Necessary approval, permission and clearance were obtained. Participants’ rights were respected. Results: The majority of practices for managing health care workers’ latent tuberculosis infection was incorrect and not aligned to the national and international TB infection control standards. Conclusions: The development and implementation of tuberculosis infection control plan as well as training program at hospital level would ensure that practices for managing health care workers’ latent tuberculosis infection has the ability to reduce further chances of acquiring tuberculosis.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Manay Kifle joined the University of Gondar as a lecture on October 24, 2007. He gives lecture for undergraduate and postgraduate classes’ courses including “Introduction to environmental health and occupational health”, “Environmental and Occupational Health and safety inspection”, “Occupational safety”, “Occupational Ergonomics”, “Industrial Hygiene and etc. He also working in undertaking researches and providing community service; supervising undergraduate and graduate students’ researches; supervising students and staff for community mobilization; developing undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum; review undergraduate and postgraduate researches; undertake other committee responsibilities; teaching undergraduate students and supervising students’ on field (Team Training program of the university) work.

Abstract:

Objective: To assess the prevalence of work related injuries and associated risk factors among production workers in iron and steel industries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: Institution based cross-sectional study design was used from August to September, 2010. Four iron and steel industries were first stratified into three sections and a total of 453 production workers were selected by simple random sampling. Data was collected by face to face interview using pre-tested and structured questionnaire, review of records and by check lists. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 16 and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to identify the associated risk factors of injuries. Results: The injury prevalence rate was 33.3% per year and most common causes of injury were splitting and flying objects (16.4%), hit by falling objects (13.7%) and machinery (12.6%). Workers were exposed to preventable workplace hazards such as to excessive noise, fumes and dusts and to old and unguarded machines, splitting materials and sparking of metals. Workers consuming alcohol during working days, without spouse, perceiving their work highly stressful and not using personal protective equipment (PPE) were more likely to be injured than their counterpart. Conclusions: Work-related injuries were high among iron and steel industries workers. Work stress, non use of PPE, consuming alcohol during working days, and excessive noise were observed as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, creating awareness by providing training about risk factors, providing PPE and establishments of safety programs in industries can reduce and prevent workplace injuries.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ahmed was born and educated in Cairo, Egypt, raised in Kuwait and has called Northwest Ohio her home since 2005. Dr. Ahmed provides healthcare services to women of all ages, she has a special interest in uro/gynecological and infertility care and care for menopausal issues.

Abstract:

Aim: The Purpose of the study is to estimate the prevalence of upper extremity symptoms and their association to Mobile Hand-Held Devices among Sharjah University Students. Subject & Methods: 200 students were recruited for the current study; all of them reported using hand held devices. 169 participants were eligible for the study. The mean age for participants was 20.24 ±1.937 were as the mean value of heights and weights were 178.36 ±129.690 and 68.5 ±18.269 respectively. Results: showed significance association between functional limitation, tingling and stiffness and type of Mobile Hand-Held devices, also showed significance association between functional limitation and average of chatting per day Conclusion: Although most of the signs and symptoms reported by the participants in the current study were mild and moderate, some of the associations observed in this study in combination with epidemiology literature, suggest feasible relationships between mobile hand-held device use and musculoskeletal symptoms of upper extremity.

A. Mettouadine

University of SidiBel Abbes, Algeria

Title: Screening of presbycusis in the workplace and identification of environmental factors

Time : 17:05 - 17:25

Biography:

A. Mettouadine working as a recident doctor at SidiBel Abbes, Algeria

Abstract:

Objective:This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of presbycusis in the workplace among employees over 45 years - not exposed to noise - from individual SMEs, SMIs in our region. Secondly, identification of environmental factors such as noise, solvents, lifestyle, socio-economic level, and associated pathologies (diabetes and hypertension). Method: Data were collected using a questionnaire during the first half of 2013, in the research laboratory environment and health. An ear, nose and throat examination and pure tone audiometry were performed systematically. The support of the survey is an anonymous questionnaire with sociodemographic data, professional, personal (medical history) and data on hearing and their psychosocial impact by "hearing handicap inventory for the elderly-screening" 10 items and classified into three stages of severity. Results:257 employees were included. Nearly one of two employees (p=49%) had a hearing problem. The remark by the environment (47%) and disorders of intelligibility (61%) were most reported. The prevalence of presbycusis was 23%. Light to moderate disability among employees with presbycusis was 15%. Conclusion:Hearing screening followed by early treatment (treatment by the bilateral prosthesis audio) can prevent Socio-professional consequences. * Ventry IM, Weinstein BE. The hearing handicap inventory for the elderly. Ear Hear. 1982 May-Jun; 3(3):128-34. ASHA.1983; 25 (7): 37-42.